tinnitus

The Blast

By Jane Prawda

It was a crisp fall day when I was confronted by a catastrophic blast that changed my mental health, and life, forever. The violent noise caused permanent ear damage―and finding the right treatment has been a constant battle.

Auditory experts agree an untreated hearing condition can cause psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. At the time of the noise trauma, I had already been living with depression for decades, since age 17, making my particular circumstances quite difficult and emotionally devastating.

On that day I will never forget, I was alone on the sidewalk of Manhattan’s Upper East Side walking home. I had no warning when, suddenly, I heard a tremendous explosion at one of the notoriously noisy construction sites on Second Avenue. At the time, New York City was enlarging the “Q” subway line by more than 30 blocks, a project that left us residents subject to years of dangerous noise.

Construction site in Manhattan

Construction site in Manhattan

Without a place to turn for help following the blast, I continued walking home. By evening, in the silence of my apartment, I could hear a faint twinkling sound in my ears: tinnitus.

It wasn’t surprising that the tinnitus quickly worsened my mental wellbeing. Frightened by the ringing in my ears, I phoned my psychiatrist. He prescribed an anti-anxiety medication.

The tinnitus soon went away, but then months later it returned. Was I experiencing lingering effects of the blast, or was it the medication provoking these disturbing sounds? With their latest re-emergence, the sounds had become louder. I was scared and felt empty inside.

I went from clinician to clinician trying all sorts of new remedies, including lipoflavinoids, neurofeedback, acupuncture, and tinnitus retraining therapy, and found no relief. The constant ringing brought me to the verge of suicide―prevented by my younger brother. He understood my agony, and I am grateful for his empathy.

In 2014 I began an experimental treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which uses highly-focused pulsed magnetic waves to stimulate nerve cells in the area of the brain that is thought to control mood. With the first treatment, the objective was to relieve tinnitus. Subsequent treatments were to relieve depression. Unfortunately, the one instance of the procedure was performed incorrectly, which not only worsened my hearing 30 dB, a mild hearing loss, but made the ringing present 24/7. It also caused transitory hyperacusis which, thankfully, I no longer live with today.

I was warned before the procedure that there was a slight chance I would lose hearing, but not that my tinnitus would become more persistent. With all symptoms worsened, I felt I’d arrived at another dead end and remained desperate for a solution.

Following the TMS treatments, I developed neuroplasticity, the brain’s formation of neural connections to adjust to injury. My audiologist believes neuroplasticity is what caused the hyperacusis to disappear and the tinnitus to subside considerably.

The tinnitus has come and gone according to my stress levels, at times even completely disappearing. With the help of my psychiatrist, I no longer struggle with depression. I’ve come to accept that a cure does not yet exist for tinnitus, so I cope in the best ways I can. Listening to the sounds of birds in the early morning, ocean waves, and babbling brooks using Resound Relief iPhone app always brought me great comfort.

Jane Prawda Headshot.png

I’ve also adapted to my mild hearing loss. I inform people I meet that I have a hearing loss and to face me when they speak; that works for me.

Through all the trauma I consider myself to be a survivor, as I am the daughter of a Holocaust survivor. It is there I draw my strengths.

Jane Prawda MA, OTR, MS/Ed has been published for her expertise in occupational therapy, including Surviving 9/11: Impact and Experiences of Occupational Therapy Practitioners. She lives in New York City.

Print Friendly and PDF

Disrupted Nerve Cell Function and Tinnitus

By Xiping Zhan, Ph.D.

Tinnitus is a condition in which one hears a ringing and/or buzzing sound in the ear without an external sound source, and as a chronic condition it can be associated with depression, anxiety, and stress. Tinnitus has been linked to hearing loss, with the majority of tinnitus cases occurring in the presence of hearing loss. For military service members and individuals who are constantly in an environment where loud noise is generated, it is a major health issue.

This figure shows the quinine effect on the physiology of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, a structure in the midbrain.

This figure shows the quinine effect on the physiology of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, a structure in the midbrain.

During this phantom ringing/buzzing sensation, neurons in the auditory cortex continue to fire in the absence of a sound source, or even after deafferentation following the loss of auditory hair cells. The underlying mechanisms of tinnitus are not yet known.

In our paper published in the journal Neurotoxicity Research in July 2018, my team and I examined chemical-induced tinnitus as a side effect of medication. Tinnitus patients who have chemical-induced tinnitus comprise a significant portion of all tinnitus sufferers, and approaching this type of tinnitus can help us to understand tinnitus in general.

We focused on quinine, an antimalarial drug that also causes hearing loss and tinnitus. We theorized this is due to the disruption of dopamine neurons rather than cochlear hair cells through the blockade of neuronal ion channels in the auditory system. We found that dopamine neurons are more sensitive than the hair cells or ganglion neurons in the auditory system. To a lesser extent, quinine also causes muscle reactions such as tremors and spasms (dystonia) and the loss of control over body movements (ataxia).

lp logo.png

As dopaminergic neurons (nerve cells that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine) are implicated in playing a role in all of these diseases, we tested the toxicity of quinine on induced dopaminergic neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells and isolated dopaminergic neurons from the mouse brain.

Xiping_zhan.jpg

We found that quinine can affect the basic physiological function of dopamine neurons in humans and mice. Specifically, we found it can target and disturb the hyperpolarization-dependent ion channels in dopamine neurons. This toxicity of quinine may underlie the movement disorders and depression seen in quinine overdoses (cinchonism), and understanding this mechanism will help to learn how dopamine plays a role in tinnitus modulation.

A 2015 ERG scientist, Xiping Zhan, Ph.D., received the Les Paul Foundation Award for Tinnitus Research. He is an assistant professor of physiology and biophysics at Howard University in Washington, D.C. One figure from the paper appeared on the cover of the July 2018 issue of Neurotoxicity Research.

We need your help supporting innovative hearing and balance science through our Emerging Research Grants program. Please make a contribution today.

 
 
Print Friendly and PDF

You Can Lead the Way

By Col. John Dillard, U.S. Army (Retired)

Folks like you are the reason Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) has just completed its 60th anniversary year of groundbreaking work toward better treatments and permanent cures for hearing loss and tinnitus. Your donations make it possible.

Tinnitus and hearing loss, respectively, are the number one and number two disabilities reported by returning American military personnel.

Tinnitus and hearing loss, respectively, are the number one and number two disabilities reported by returning American military personnel.

Thank you for everything you do.

Living with noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus following 26 years of service in the U.S. Army, I strongly share your desire for more scientific developments — both to restore hearing and to prevent its loss.

Every person serving on our Board of Directors is also connected to a hearing disorder in some way and shares our passion for progress. It is coming. As each year passes we learn more and more about key processes in the brain and auditory system.

We’re grateful for these discoveries that bring us closer to hearing regeneration in adult mice (as human proxies for now), and toward new treatments for tinnitus, Ménière's disease, and related conditions. But we know more must be accomplished for all of us to enjoy a better quality of life.

Your generosity can make possible the discoveries we — our veterans, our parents, our children, our spouses, our friends — urgently need.

Please, if you are able, give today to HHF to fund more innovative scientists in 2019-2020 and accelerate much-needed treatments and cures.

HHF will direct 100% of your gift toward the program your choose — Hearing Restoration Project (HRP), Emerging Research Grants (ERG), Ménière's Disease Grants (MDG), or Education. Thank you for your consideration and for being part of our mission.

Print Friendly and PDF

Suffering After Sacrifice

By Lauren McGrath

Every Veterans Day, Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) celebrates the brave individuals who have served and sacrificed to defend our country. We are grateful to our active military members and veterans for their courageous protection of American values and freedoms.

As we honor those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, we acknowledge a tragic and troubling health problem. An astounding number of veterans—60% of those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan—live with tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss. In 2017, the Veterans Administration reported 1.79 million disability compensation recipients for tinnitus and 1.16 million compensation recipients for hearing loss, the number one and two disabilities, respectively. In an HHF video about hearing loss treatment, Retired Army Colonel John Dilliard, Chair-Elect of HHF’s Board of Directors, explains, “The noise from repeated gunfire and high-frequency, high-performance aircraft engines takes its toll on the human hearing mechanisms.” Col. Dillard lives with both tinnitus and hearing loss following 26 years of service.

John Dillard and fellow soldiers, Fort Irwin National Training Center, 1977.

John Dillard and fellow soldiers, Fort Irwin National Training Center, 1977.

Dr. Bruce Douglas, 93, remembers the moment his hearing became severely compromised while serving in the Navy during the Korean War. “On what was my 26th birthday, after pulling the trigger on the M1 rifle with no protection (none of us had any) multiple times, I was left with tendonitis in both knees—and worse, permanent, chronic tinnitus due to acoustic trauma. My hearing went downhill ever after, and every imaginable kind of sound and sensation has resulted from my tinnitus,” Douglas writes in the Fall 2018 issue of Hearing Health.

Hearing protection training must start as soon as one enters the military. But there is a misconception that hearing protection inhibits vital communication and mission readiness because hearing signs of danger is imperative to survival. “Soldiers want to be able to hear the snap of the twig and want to be able to be situationally. As a result, they are often resistant to wearing hearing protection,” Col. Dillard says.

Fortunately, sophisticated hearing protection technology does exist so that military personnel do not have to choose between protecting their ears or their lives. Examples include noise-attenuating helmets, which use ear cups to protect against hazardous sound, and Tactical Communication and Protective Systems, which protect against loud noises while amplifying soft ones.

The U.S. military continues to work toward safer hearing in the service. The U.S. Army has developed the Tactical Communication and Protective System (TCAPS), which are earbuds that dampen dangerous noises to safe levels using microphones and noise-canceling technology, while also providing amplification of softer sounds and two-way communication systems. An initiative by the U.S. Air Force called Total Exposure Health (TEH), meanwhile, focuses on overall health both on and off the job, will measure cumulative noise exposure over the course of 24 hours. These developments and others, which HHF applauds, are covered in greater detail in Hearing Heath’s Fall 2017 issue.

As greater preventative technology for our military becomes available, HHF remains dedicated to finding better treatments and cures for tinnitus and hearing loss to benefit the lives of millions of Americans, including veterans, a disproportionately affected group. We hope you will join us in remembering their sacrifices with gratitude and compassion.

Print Friendly and PDF

Measuring Brain Signals Leads to Insights Into Mild Tinnitus

By Julia Campbell, Au.D., Ph.D.

Tinnitus, or the perception of sound where none is present, has been estimated to affect approximately 15 percent of adults. Unfortunately, there is no cure for tinnitus, nor is there an objective measure of the disorder, with professionals relying instead upon patient report.

There are several theories as to why tinnitus occurs, with one of the more prevalent hypotheses involving what is termed decreased inhibition. Neural inhibition is a normal function throughout the nervous system, and works in tandem with excitatory neural signals for accomplishing tasks ranging from motor output to the processing of sensory input. In sensory processing, such as hearing, both inhibitory and excitatory neural signals depend on external input.

For example, if an auditory signal cannot be relayed through the central auditory pathways due to cochlear damage resulting in hearing loss, both central excitation and inhibition may be reduced. This reduction in auditory-related inhibitory function may result in several changes in the central nervous system, including increased spontaneous neural firing, neural synchrony, and reorganization of cortical regions in the brain. Such changes, or plasticity, could possibly result in the perception of tinnitus, allowing signals that are normally suppressed to be perceived by the affected individual. Indeed, tinnitus has been reported in an estimated 30 percent of those with clinical hearing loss over the frequency range of 0.25 to 8 kilohertz (kHz), suggesting that cochlear damage and tinnitus may be interconnected.

However, many individuals with clinically normal hearing report tinnitus. Therefore, it is possible that in this specific population, inhibitory dysfunction may not underlie these phantom perceptions, or may arise from a different trigger other than hearing loss.

One measure of central inhibition is sensory gating. Sensory gating involves filtering out signals that are repetitive and therefore unimportant for conscious perception. This automatic process can be measured through electrical responses in the brain, termed cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs). CAEPs are recorded via electroencephalography (EEG) using noninvasive sensors to record electrical activity from the brain at the level of the scalp.

Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are recorded via electroencephalography (EEG) using noninvasive sensors to record electrical activity from the brain.

Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are recorded via electroencephalography (EEG) using noninvasive sensors to record electrical activity from the brain.

In healthy gating function, it is expected that the CAEP response to an initial auditory signal will be larger in amplitude when compared with a secondary CAEP response elicited by the same auditory signal. This illustrates the inhibition of repetitive information by the central nervous system. If inhibitory processes are dysfunctional, CAEP responses are similar in amplitude, reflecting decreased inhibition and the reduced filtering of incoming auditory information.

Due to the hypothesis that atypical inhibition may play a role in tinnitus, we conducted a study to evaluate inhibitory function in adults with normal hearing, with and without mild tinnitus, using sensory gating measures. To our knowledge, sensory gating had not been used to investigate central inhibition in individuals with tinnitus. We also evaluated extended high-frequency auditory sensitivity in participants at 10, 12.5, and 16 kHz—which are frequencies not included in the usual clinical evaluation—to determine if participants with mild tinnitus showed hearing loss in these regions.

Tinnitus severity was measured subjectively using the Tinnitus Handicap Index. This score was correlated with measures of gating function to determine if tinnitus severity may be worse with decreased inhibition.

Our results, published in Audiology Research on Oct. 2, 2018, showed that gating function was impaired in adults with typical hearing and mild tinnitus, and that decreased gating was significantly correlated with tinnitus severity. In addition, those with tinnitus did not show significantly different extended high-frequency thresholds in comparison to the participants without tinnitus, but it was found that better hearing in this frequency range related to worse tinnitus severity.

This result conflicts with the theory that hearing loss may trigger tinnitus, at least in adults with typical hearing, and may indicate that these individuals possess heightened auditory awareness, although this hypothesis should be directly tested.

Julia Campbell.jpg
les pauls 100th logo.png

Overall, it appears that central inhibition is atypical in adults with typical hearing and tinnitus, and that this is not related to hearing loss as measured in clinically or non-clinically tested frequency regions. The cause of decreased inhibition in this population remains unknown, but genetic factors may play a role. We are currently investigating the use of sensory gating as an objective clinical measure of tinnitus, particularly in adults with hearing loss, as well as the networks in the brain that may underlie dysfunctional gating processes.

2016 Emerging Research Grants scientist Julia Campbell, Au.D., Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA, received the Les Paul Foundation Award for Tinnitus Research. She is an assistant professor in communication sciences and disorders in the Central Sensory Processes Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin.

Print Friendly and PDF

How Nutrition Affects Our Hearing

By Meagan Rowley

Nutrition is fundamental to health, but seldom does one learn about the relationship between diet and the auditory system. Nutrition and hearing ability are, in fact, connected.

There is no specific food that will definitely cause or prevent hearing loss. Likewise, lost hearing cannot be restored through a diet change. However, new research suggests that certain nutrition patterns may actually decrease—or increase—your risk of developing hearing loss.

A 22-Year Diet Study

A Brigham and Women’s Hospital study monitored the hearing health of more than 70,000 women on various diets for 22 years. These diets included the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (AMED), Dietary Approaches to Shop Hypertension (DASH), and Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010). These diets favor fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts, legumes, whole grains, seafood, poultry, and low-fat dairy. All three also advise limiting foods that are high in sodium (salt) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, discouraging consumption of refined and red meats, processed foods, and sugary drinks.

nutrition-hearing-health.jpg

Women following diets similar to the AHEI-2010, DASH, and AMED decreased their likelihoods of hearing loss by at least 30 percent, with DASH and AMED showing the greatest benefits. The researchers found that diets that prioritize fruits and vegetables with minerals like folic acid, potassium, and zinc decreased the risk of hearing loss.

Beneficial Nutrients

Other findings indicate that certain nutrients are associated with positive hearing health outcomes. Potassium—a mineral found in bananas, potatoes, and black beans—plays a large role in the way that the inner ear functions and converts sounds into signals for the brain to interpret. Regular intake can help you maintain your current level of hearing, says Sherif F. Tadros, M.D., of the International Center for Hearing and Speech Research in a Europe PubMed Central published study.

George E. Shambaugh, Jr., M.D., of the Shambaugh Hearing and Allergy Institute reports that the zinc in almonds, cashews, and dark chocolate can be an effective treatment for tinnitus, hearing ringing or buzzing without an external sound source. Magnesium is believed to combat free radicals emitted during loud noises and act as a barrier protecting inner ear hair cells.

Folic acid has also been shown to possibly slow the onset of hearing loss. Blood flow is restricted by homocysteine (an amino acid), so folic acid works to metabolize it to keep blow flow regulated. According to Jane Durga, Ph.D., of the Nestlé Research Center in Lausanne, Switzerland, because the inner ear relies on a regular flow of blood, folate is extremely important. Foods high in folic acid include spinach, broccoli, and asparagus.

Adverse Effects of Malnutrition

Conversely, malnutrition negatively affects the human body. In an examination of 2,193 participants ages 16 to 23, Susan D. Emmett, M.D., and colleagues found that malnutrition not only stunts anatomical development in children, but slows inner ear development. Malnourished children were observed as being twice as a likely to develop hearing loss as young adults compared to their well-nourished peers.

Further, the study acknowledges that that stunting often begins before birth. A malnourished woman who is pregnant or nursing is likely to pass on any deficiency she may have to her child. Hindered inner ear development in utero caused by malnutrition contributes to a higher risk of hearing loss than does malnutrition in vivo.

Diabetes Connection

Individuals with type II diabetes also are more likely to develop hearing loss than their nondiabetic counterparts, according to an National Institutes of Health-funded project by researcher Chika Horikawa, Ph.D., of Japan’s Niigata University. Subjects with prediabetes—those who have elevated blood sugar levels but not elevated enough for a diagnosis of diabetes—also have a 30 percent increased risk The study authors attribute the higher risk to damaged nerves and blood vessels of the inner ear, a consequence of having type II diabetes for an extended period of time.

Though rarely acknowledged, diet has a lot to do with the auditory system. Adding just a few foods to your daily diet and paying attention to the nutrients that your diet is missing may significantly impact hearing over the long term.

As an aspiring doctor currently studying nutrition during my undergraduate years, I understand how important it is to look at an individual's state of health from different angles and perspectives. Nutrition is vital to every aspect of health.

An HHF summer intern, Meagan Rowley is a senior on the pre-medicine track studying human nutrition at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

Receive updates on life-changing hearing research and resources by subscribing to HHF's free quarterly magazine and e-newsletter.

 
 
Print Friendly and PDF

Introducing the 2018 Emerging Research Grantees

By Lauren McGrath

ERG Logo.jpg

Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) is pleased to present our Emerging Research Grants (ERG) awardees for the 2018 project cycle.

Grantee Tenzin Ngodup, Ph.D., will investigate neuronal activity in the ventral cochlear nucleus to help prevent and treat tinnitus.

Grantee Tenzin Ngodup, Ph.D., will investigate neuronal activity in the ventral cochlear nucleus to help prevent and treat tinnitus.

15 individuals at various institutions nationwide—including Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, and the National Cancer Institute—will conduct innovative research in the following topic areas:

  • Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD)

  • General Hearing Health

  • Hearing Loss in Children

  • Hyperacusis

  • Tinnitus

  • Usher Syndrome

Our grantees’ research investigations seek to solve specific auditory and vestibular problems such as declines in complex sound processing in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), ototoxicity caused by the life-saving chemotherapy drug cisplatin, and noise-induced hearing loss.

HHF looks forward to the advancements that will come about from these promising scientific endeavors. The foundation owes many thanks to the General Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons International, Cochlear, Hyperacusis Research, the Les Paul Foundation, and several generous, anonymous donors who have collectively empowered this important work.

We are currently planning for our 2019 ERG grant cycle, for which applications will open September 1. Learn more about the application process.

WE NEED YOUR HELP IN FUNDING THE EXCITING WORK OF HEARING AND BALANCE SCIENTISTS. DONATE TODAY TO HEARING HEALTH FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH: HHF.ORG/DONATE.

Grantee Rachael R. Baiduc, Ph.D., will identify  cardiovascular disease risk factors that may contribute to hearing loss.

Grantee Rachael R. Baiduc, Ph.D., will identify
cardiovascular disease risk factors that may contribute to hearing loss.

Print Friendly and PDF

Researchers Fighting the Effects of Noise

By Yishane Lee

The cornerstone of Hearing Health Foundation, ever since its founding in 1958 as the Deafness Research Foundation, has been funding early-career researchers who bring innovative thinking to hearing and balance research. HHF’s Emerging Research Grants (ERG) are awarded to the most promising scientists in the field, with many going on to earn prestigious National Institutes of Health backing.

HHF is always proud to see ERG grantees thrive in their careers and research. Most recently, two ERG scientists funded in the mid-1990s have made headlines, each for treatments for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).

1996 and 1997 ERG scientist John Oghalai, M.D., of the University of Southern California, coauthored a study showing promise for preventing NIHL. Published May 7, 2018, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Oghalai and team used miniature optics to examine the mouse cochlea after exposure to extremely loud noise, and found that in addition to immediate hair cell death, a fluid buildup in the inner ear over several hours eventually led to nerve cell loss. The fluid buildup, or endolymph hydrops, contributes to synaptopathy, or damage to the auditory nerve cell synapse. In a USC News press release, Oghalai described the excess fluid as a feeling of fullness and ringing in the ear that a person may experience after attending a loud concert.

Because the extra fluid showed a high concentration of potassium, the team saw a method to re-balance the fluids that naturally occur in the inner ear by injecting a salt (sodium) and sugar solution into the middle ear three hours after exposure. Nerve cell loss was reduced by 45 to 64 percent, which may help preserve hearing. The researchers see applications for this treatment for military service members who experience blast trauma as well as for people who have Ménière’s disease, the hearing and balance condition that is associated with inner ear fluid buildup.

Images from the cochleae of guinea pigs show the presence of more hair cells in animals treated with a short interfering RNA that interrupts a gene upregulated after damage (right; control on left). Inner and outer hair cells (IHC and OHC) are labeled in green, stereocilia in yellow, and nuclei in blue. Arrowheads indicate ectopic hair cells. Credit:    The Scientist    via    Molecular Therapy   .

Images from the cochleae of guinea pigs show the presence of more hair cells in animals treated with a short interfering RNA that interrupts a gene upregulated after damage (right; control on left). Inner and outer hair cells (IHC and OHC) are labeled in green, stereocilia in yellow, and nuclei in blue. Arrowheads indicate ectopic hair cells. Credit: The Scientist via Molecular Therapy.

1996 ERG scientist Richard Kopke, M.D., FACS, of the Hough Ear Institute in Oklahoma, spent more than 20 years serving with the U.S. Army, becoming well aware of the dangers of NIHL for service members. In a paper in Molecular Therapy, published online in March 2018, Kopke and colleagues used “small interfering RNAs” (siRNAs) to block the activity of the Notch signaling pathway gene Hes1 that itself blocks hair cell differentiation in developing supporting cells and may contribute to the failure of hair cells to regenerate after injury.

These siRNAs were delivered using nanoparticles directly injected to the cochleae of live, adult guinea pigs. Kopke’s team had previously shown using siRNAs to block Hes1 to be effective in regenerating hair cells in cultured mouse cochlea. In the current study, the 24-hour, sustained-release of siRNAs through nanoparticles three days after deafening resulted in the recovery of some hearing ability, measured using auditory brainstem responses, at three weeks and continuing to nine weeks, when the study ended. Compared with the control mice, the RNA-injected mice showed less overall hair cell loss and early signs of immature hair cell development, which the authors say may signal hair cell regeneration. Hearing loss caused by noise, chemotherapy drugs, or aging that damages or kills hair cells are all targets for this potential treatment.

In an article in The Scientist, HHF’s Hearing Restoration Project consortium member Jennifer Stone, Ph.D., who was not involved in the paper, echoed the study authors in saying further research should work to determine which cells are turning into hair cells, and whether the observed hair cell development is truly new hair cells and not the repair of damaged hair cells. Kopke and team plan to test the treatment using longer periods between deafening and injection, while also modifying dose and delivery.

We need your help supporting innovative hearing and balance science through our Emerging Research Grants program. Please make a contribution today.

 
 
Print Friendly and PDF

One Person’s Lifelong Experience with Hearing Loss

By Dr. Bruce L. Douglas

I am a 93-year-old healthy adult with hearing loss. Many parts of my body don’t work perfectly right anymore, but my hearing loss is my biggest physical difficulty.

078 Bruce.jpg

When it comes to hearing loss, I’ve been there and done that. Despite the fact that I am legally deaf, I can hear. Why? Because I’ve stubbornly fought back every time a hearing pitfall appeared in my path.

The reason I can hear is because I refuse to give into my disability. I try out every kind of useful assistive hearing device I can lay my hands on or is given to me by my Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) audiologist. I’ve become a hearing loss activist and fight for coiling of public facilities whenever I have the chance to do so. And I recently had a cochlear implant installed about a year ago.

As a boy, I remember always taking a seat at the front of the room, when most other kids would vie for one in the back, so they could cheat on exams without being seen by the teacher. I didn’t realize how poor my hearing was until I was reprimanded for inconspicuously (I thought) using a nail clipper under my desk in my elementary school classroom. I had no idea because I couldn’t hear it!

I tried to come to terms with my hearing loss for many years. I refused to hide in corners of rooms and restaurants, and dealt with my problem largely by disclosing my hearing loss to people and asking for their cooperation in our verbal relationships. My early hearing aids only allowed me to hear sounds but not comprehend them, so I learned to lip read and stare at my companions, often to the point of distraction.  

I have presbycusis, I’m suffering from acoustic trauma from my time in the Korean War, I have sensorineural deprivation, and I’ve experienced every imaginable kind of sound and sensation in the form of tinnitus.

Call us what you will, but don’t ignore us; don’t make fun of us. Most importantly, respect us; and treat us as equals. Be patient with us and accept the reality that we have an invisible condition that wove its way into our nervous system, most often beyond our control, and we do all we can to listen to you and respond to the best of our ability.

Dr. Bruce Douglas is a Professor of Health and Aging at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. He is a participant in HHF’s Faces of Hearing Loss campaign.

Receive updates on life-changing hearing research and resources by subscribing to HHF's free quarterly magazine and e-newsletter.

 
 
Print Friendly and PDF

Hearing Loss Lives with Me

By Sonya Daniel

Sonya Faces of HL.jpeg

I was born with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. I didn’t know the official term for it until 2008. When I was a kid in elementary school I passed every hearing test that the mothers in the PTA administered. I was a pretty clever little girl. I learned that every test has a visible “tell” and knew how to guess “right” on all of them. I never wanted to fail any test. I learned to read lips, and assumed everyone heard that annoying ringing constantly. That, of course isn’t true.

The tinnitus became too overwhelming to deal with everyday. I hadn’t had my ears tested since I was little, so I didn’t know what to expect. It was much worse than I had ever imagined it would be. And now it had a name. I left the audiologist knowing at some point I’d be completely deaf. But, no one knows when that might be. I was a mother to three young boys. I wondered how much longer I’d hear, “Mommy, I love you.” Or If they’d hold out long enough to hear their grown-up man voices. How much longer until I couldn’t hear music?

Music is my passion. In fact, it’s my chosen profession. I never remember wanting to do anything but be a musician in some capacity. My dad played the guitar. My mother said when I was little I would sit in front of him and touch his guitar and I would stand in front of the stereo and touch the speakers. I suppose I was trying to “hear” the music. I knew I’d go to college and major in music as a vocalist. I knew I wanted to share my love for music and teach others.

College was a very difficult and stressful time. There was a course called “Sight Singing and Ear Training” required to complete my Bachelor’s in Music. I mean, come on! Ear training? I struggled. Professors struggled to teach me. Some never gave up because it was apparent I wasn’t going anywhere.

I did get to teach music to every level. I can’t do that anymore, but I still do music everyday. Sometimes in life you have to know that there are things that your body just won’t let you do. I’d like to be a 6’0” tall, blonde supermodel, too. My body said “no” to that and I think I’m ok.      
Living with tinnitus and hearing loss can be overwhelming and difficult. I’m not as afraid of living this way as I used to be. Everyone has a thing. This is just mine. I like to say I don’t live with hearing loss; it lives with me.

My journey has brought me to the cochlear implant. I’m a candidate in the preliminary stages of that process. Technology changes so fast it’s hard to keep up. My current devices have stronger receiver tubes and ear molds.

That’s just my journey with my ears. My life isn’t defined by or consumed with my ears, although it’s felt that way at times. I’m constantly learning and growing. I’m getting stronger with each high and low I face. But, isn’t that just life?

Sonya Daniel is a musician/teacher, writer, and voiceover artist. She is a participant in HHF’s “Faces of Hearing Loss” campaign.

Receive updates on life-changing hearing research and resources by subscribing to HHF's free quarterly magazine and e-newsletter.

 
 
Print Friendly and PDF