A Woman's Canine Ears

By Barbara M.      

I always knew I wanted to work with people after high school. Though I struggled throughout my education, I graduated, miraculously, thanks to my supportive family and hearing aid technology. With a high school degree I was eligible for Vocational Nurses (VN) school, a career I maintained for over 23 years.

My sensorineural hearing loss was diagnosed at around age 4, well before newborn hearing screenings were commonplace, in 1954. “Barbie needs to see your face when you talk, Mommy,” my sister announced one day, cluing my parents into a possible hearing problem.

Barbara and her current hearing dog (HD), Fallon.

Barbara and her current hearing dog (HD), Fallon.

I wore behind-the-ear hearing aids and equally relied upon speech-reading, but academics were a constant challenge. Math was the most difficult for me because my teachers often faced the chalkboards, not us students, while writing and explaining equations. My family spent many hours tutoring math to me to ensure I passed.

After high school, I was employed as a nurse’s aide in a long-term care facility. I enjoyed working with and helping the elderly patients, which encouraged me to apply to VN training school. I entered with strong professional references and my two instructors were aware of my hearing loss, so I felt secure.

During the last week of the six-week academic training, which immediately precedes clinical duty training, one of the VN instructors requested a private meeting. She had concerns about my hearing loss. “What if you’re in a situation where you could not hear a patient call/cry out?” she pressed.

Devastated, I reasoned with her hoping she would allow me to begin clinical duty on a trial basis to prove my ability to meet their expectations. I suggested this even though I knew in my heart it would personally difficult to withstand 17 additional months of required training under her surveillance. She pushed back, expressing I could be jeopardizing a patient's life or she could lose her job. I was crushed! I ultimately chose to withdraw from this VN school, knowing I’d be accepted to another school. I was—and graduated to go on to pass the California State Board for licensure.

Some time after my licensure, I was driving past my first VN school and a thought occurred to me; I needed to share my good news with my once doubtful instructor. The instructor with whom I spoke remembered me and congratulated me on my achievement. We chatted amicably before she revealed that the 'other' instructor had since resigned—due to hearing loss she experienced the year after I withdrew from the VN program. I was in disbelief! I hoped she, too, had not faced discrimination. Empathetically, I expressed my concern that no one should be discriminated against because of their disability.

About halfway into my nursing career, in the 1980s, I found myself with the need to to hear more and relied more on speech-reading. I often felt tired and mentally overloaded in noisy environments. One of my biggest challenges during this time was caring for my son, born in 1987. My husband, a firefighter who often worked 48-to-72-hour shifts away from home, cleverly devised a sound-activated light system to alert me when our son made noise or cried in his crib. This was a perfect solution, I thought—except in the case of power outages.

I needed to find another way to alert me to my son's voice at night. It came to me the following year while reading National Geographic, where I saw an advertisement about Canine Companions for Independence (CCI), a nonprofit organization that enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing them with service dogs and ongoing support. I applied and was paired up with Ronnie, my first Hearing Dog (HD), who helped me immensely by alerting me to important sounds within my home.

Gradually and for unknown reasons my hearing loss continued to decline and I found myself avoiding noisy establishments & places. In 1999 I made the decision to resign from employment so as to ensure quality patient care I no longer was able to auscultate (hear) important lung sounds using the stethoscope. With my skills as a nurse, I chose to transition to be a care provider for my aging parents-in-law, and later, my mother.

I am personally proud that I was able to remain productive after my resignation, largely because of the assistance of my HD Ronnie and later, Fallon. Having been highly trained I considered them to be my canine-ear-partners, they alerted me to many important sounds such as doorbells, knocking, whistling tea kettles, and my telephone's ringing.

Ronnie and Fallon helped me to overcome my hidden handicap, a personal milestone towards acceptance of my hearing loss.

Barbara lives in Oregon with her husband, Dan.

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Improved TMC1 Gene Therapy Restores Hearing and Balance in Mice

By Christopher Geissler, Ph.D.

Half of all inner ear disorders, which have a negative impact on hearing and/or balance, are caused by genetic mutations. A study published in January 2019 in Nature Communications demonstrates the effectiveness of a gene therapy targeting one specific gene mutation, TMC1 (transmembrane channel-like 1). The research was conducted by Carl A. Nist-Lund in the Harvard Medical School lab of Gwenaëlle S. Géléoc, Ph.D., and Jeffrey R. Holt, Ph.D., with contributions from colleagues including 2017 Emerging Research Grants (ERG) recipient Jennifer Resnik, Ph.D., and her ERG co-principal investigator Daniel B. Polley, Ph.D., both also of Harvard Medical School.

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So far, 35 TMC1 mutations have been identified in humans, including several that are responsible for moderate to severe hearing loss, representing between 3 to 8 percent of cases of genetic hearing loss. This TMC1 gene therapy has had an encouraging level of success in mice and may prove capable of addressing similar genetic mutations in humans in the future.

Previous studies targeting this gene were only moderately successful in restoring function in inner hair cells, with little or no success in outer hair cells. Both types of hair cell are necessary for hearing.

The team decided to look at improving the mechanism that encodes TCM1 in affected mice, using a synthetic delivery vehicle they hoped would be more effective than the conventional one used in previous studies. In mice with this TCM1 mutation, hair cells begin to die when the mouse reaches 4 weeks of age. The treated mice in this study showed improved rates of survival in both inner and outer hair cells.

Most importantly, the improvement in hearing in the mice that received this intervention occurred primarily in the lower frequencies. Human speech is at the low to mid frequency range of the auditory spectrum, so if future human trials are able to replicate the success of this study, speech perception may improve.

The study additionally provided evidence of improved responses in the brain of the treated mice. This indicates that treatment of the cochlea by injection had knock-on effects in the auditory cortex, the part of the brain that plays an important role in hearing.

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Finally, the team recorded improved balance function in the mice that received the gene therapy. While only very young mice experienced better hearing, even older mice showed improvement in balance. The team writes that this improvement in balance function in mature mice may contribute to eventually developing a way to treat balance disorders in humans.

Jennifer Resnik, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in the Polley Lab, part of the Eaton Peabody Laboratories, Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School. Her 2017 Emerging Research Grant was generously funded by Hyperacusis Research Ltd. Christopher Geissler, Ph.D., is HHF’s director of program and research support.

Empower groundbreaking research toward better treatments and cures for hearing loss and tinnitus. If you are able, please make a contribution today.

 
 
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HHF Endorses California Pediatric Hearing Aids Bill

A young girl speaks at the podium during Assemblyman Bloom’s press conference to introduce his bill to require insurance companies to cover pediatric hearing aids. Credit: Richard Bloom

A young girl speaks at the podium during Assemblyman Bloom’s press conference to introduce his bill to require insurance companies to cover pediatric hearing aids. Credit: Richard Bloom

Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) has formally endorsed AB 598, a bill in California calling for the expansion of hearing aid insurance coverage for children.

California resident Elizabeth Keithley, Ph.D., Chair of HHF’s Board of Directors, recently wrote a letter of support to Assemblywoman Lorena Sanchez, who has stopped earlier versions of the bill. You can read her letter below.

If you live in California and would like to identify and contact your representative about AB 598, you may do so here.


Letter of Support from Elizabeth Keithley, Ph.D.

Dear Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez,

Thank you for the leadership you provide to San Diego. I write to you as the Chair of the Board of Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) and Professor Emerita of Surgery/Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. I am requesting your support for AB 598, introduced by Assemblyman Richard Bloom, which will require insurance coverage for children’s hearing aids in our state.

HHF is the nation’s largest nonprofit funder of hearing and balance research. Our scientists’ work has led to development of cochlear implants, innovative ear treatments, and progress toward biological cures for hearing loss. We work tirelessly to better the lives of the 50 million Americans with hearing loss.

Beyond research, HHF has been a longtime advocate for Universal Newborn Hearing Screenings, federally mandated in the 1990s. Identifying hearing loss at birth enables parents to promptly pursue intervention for their child. The first six months of a child’s life are the most critical in forming auditory pathways in the brain to hear.

The majority of individuals with sensorineural (permanent) hearing loss, including children, can benefit from hearing aids as treatment to communicate, learn, and develop healthily. A pair of pediatric hearing aids can burden a family by as much as $6000 per pair, which generally must be replaced every three to five years. This is an out-of-pocket expense of over $40,000 before a child reaches 21.

This immense financial barrier to treatment result in absence of treatment that then inhibits children’s social, speech and language development, and academic performance. For an individual child who does not receive intervention, the estimated cost of special education and loss of productivity is $1M.

Right now, California urgently needs the help of leaders like you to relieve families from the stress of choosing between hearing aids for their children and other health necessities. The strength of the future CA workforce depends on it.

Thank you for your consideration. I truly hope you will act to support California’s children through AB 598.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth M. Keithley, Ph.D.

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The Blast

By Jane Prawda

It was a crisp fall day when I was confronted by a catastrophic blast that changed my mental health, and life, forever. The violent noise caused permanent ear damage―and finding the right treatment has been a constant battle.

Auditory experts agree an untreated hearing condition can cause psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. At the time of the noise trauma, I had already been living with depression for decades, since age 17, making my particular circumstances quite difficult and emotionally devastating.

On that day I will never forget, I was alone on the sidewalk of Manhattan’s Upper East Side walking home. I had no warning when, suddenly, I heard a tremendous explosion at one of the notoriously noisy construction sites on Second Avenue. At the time, New York City was enlarging the “Q” subway line by more than 30 blocks, a project that left us residents subject to years of dangerous noise.

Construction site in Manhattan

Construction site in Manhattan

Without a place to turn for help following the blast, I continued walking home. By evening, in the silence of my apartment, I could hear a faint twinkling sound in my ears: tinnitus.

It wasn’t surprising that the tinnitus quickly worsened my mental wellbeing. Frightened by the ringing in my ears, I phoned my psychiatrist. He prescribed an anti-anxiety medication.

The tinnitus soon went away, but then months later it returned. Was I experiencing lingering effects of the blast, or was it the medication provoking these disturbing sounds? With their latest re-emergence, the sounds had become louder. I was scared and felt empty inside.

I went from clinician to clinician trying all sorts of new remedies, including lipoflavinoids, neurofeedback, acupuncture, and tinnitus retraining therapy, and found no relief. The constant ringing brought me to the verge of suicide―prevented by my younger brother. He understood my agony, and I am grateful for his empathy.

In 2014 I began an experimental treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which uses highly-focused pulsed magnetic waves to stimulate nerve cells in the area of the brain that is thought to control mood. With the first treatment, the objective was to relieve tinnitus. Subsequent treatments were to relieve depression. Unfortunately, the one instance of the procedure was performed incorrectly, which not only worsened my hearing 30 dB, a mild hearing loss, but made the ringing present 24/7. It also caused transitory hyperacusis which, thankfully, I no longer live with today.

I was warned before the procedure that there was a slight chance I would lose hearing, but not that my tinnitus would become more persistent. With all symptoms worsened, I felt I’d arrived at another dead end and remained desperate for a solution.

Following the TMS treatments, I developed neuroplasticity, the brain’s formation of neural connections to adjust to injury. My audiologist believes neuroplasticity is what caused the hyperacusis to disappear and the tinnitus to subside considerably.

The tinnitus has come and gone according to my stress levels, at times even completely disappearing. With the help of my psychiatrist, I no longer struggle with depression. I’ve come to accept that a cure does not yet exist for tinnitus, so I cope in the best ways I can. Listening to the sounds of birds in the early morning, ocean waves, and babbling brooks using Resound Relief iPhone app always brought me great comfort.

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I’ve also adapted to my mild hearing loss. I inform people I meet that I have a hearing loss and to face me when they speak; that works for me.

Through all the trauma I consider myself to be a survivor, as I am the daughter of a Holocaust survivor. It is there I draw my strengths.

Jane Prawda MA, OTR, MS/Ed has been published for her expertise in occupational therapy, including Surviving 9/11: Impact and Experiences of Occupational Therapy Practitioners. She lives in New York City.

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What You Made Possible in 2018

By Lauren McGrath

Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) is thrilled to release our new Annual Report, a compact account of Fiscal Year 2018 (October 1, 2017 - September 30). The report’s few dozen pages are symbolically bound between striking images of the inner ears of mice — our small, fellow mammals who continue to show new capabilities in hearing restoration, which will one day be possible for people with hearing loss.

Inside, you’ll find summaries of the most important discoveries that have emerged from our scientists’ labs — in almost all 50 states (see our map of funded institutions on p. 14)! Updates from the Hearing Restoration Project, Emerging Research Grants, and Ménière's Disease Grants programs kick off on p. 28. This work is only possible because of our generous and committed supporters. A few remarkable donors’ stories are highlighted on pp. 6-9, and the full list of those who gave begins on p. 16.

2018 was HHF’s 60th anniversary year, and in celebration of turning “60 years strong,” the report also catalogues some of the notable accomplishments that materialized because of the ambitious vision of our late founder, Collette Ramsey Baker, beginning on p. 10. “My mother made a promise that, if [her hearing loss surgery] worked, she would do something to support research to find the causes of deafness and develop better treatments,” said Ramsey Baker’s daughter, Collette Wynn.

As noted by Board Chair Elizabeth Keithley, Ph.D. in her opening remarks (pp. 4-5), HHF is proud to retain top marks for transparency and use of program funds by all major charity watchdogs. You can review financial information on pp. 38-40 and in our Audited Financials.

We extend our gratitude to all who made possible the work enclosed in this report. Should you have questions about the contents, feel free to contact us at development@hhf.org.

You can read HHF’s FY18 Annual Report here.

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Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals More Clues for Hair Cell Regeneration

By Mark E. Lush, Ph.D., and Daniel C. Diaz

Sensorineural hearing loss in mammals can often be attributed to damage or destruction of the delicate hair cells located within the inner ear. The microscopic hairlike projections on the surface of these cells are the key structure responsible for converting sound waves to electrical signals that travel to the brain through the auditory nerve. Unlike mammals, other vertebrates such as fish, birds, and reptiles routinely regenerate sensory hair cells during homeostasis and following injury. By studying the genetic program of hair cell regeneration in nonmammalian vertebrate organisms, researchers may discover therapeutic targets for treating hearing loss in humans.

The lateral line is a sensory system that allows aquatic vertebrates to orient themselves by detecting water motion. The lateral line organs (neuromasts), distributed on the head and along the body, contain approximately 60 cells, composed of central sensory hair cells surrounded by support cells and an outer ring of mantle cells. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, we combined some of the less well-defined clusters and identified major neuromast cell types, shown in this illustration, ranging from support cells to mature sensory hair cells. Credit: The lab of Tatiana Piotrowski, Ph.D., Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City

The lateral line is a sensory system that allows aquatic vertebrates to orient themselves by detecting water motion. The lateral line organs (neuromasts), distributed on the head and along the body, contain approximately 60 cells, composed of central sensory hair cells surrounded by support cells and an outer ring of mantle cells. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, we combined some of the less well-defined clusters and identified major neuromast cell types, shown in this illustration, ranging from support cells to mature sensory hair cells. Credit: The lab of Tatiana Piotrowski, Ph.D., Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City

One such organism, the zebrafish, has emerged as a powerful model for studying sensory hair cell regeneration. Like other fish, zebrafish contain a network of sensory hair cells throughout their body to detect changes in water movement. The hair cells are located in small organs in the skin called neuromasts, which also contains cell types that are remarkably similar to those found in the mammalian inner ear. To study the genetic program of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish, we sequenced the RNA of individual cells within neuromasts, allowing us to classify cell types based on their gene expression signature. This included cells transitioning from support cells to fully mature sensory hair cells, thereby identifying new genes that are expressed during hair cell development. In addition, we characterized the role of the growth factor fgf3, and found that it acts to inhibit hair cell progenitor proliferation. Our results were published in the journal eLife on Jan. 25, 2019. Future work will examine the function of these genes in sensory hair cell regeneration.

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Mark E. Lush, Ph.D., and Daniel C. Diaz both work in the lab of Tatjana Piotrowski, Ph.D., at Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City. Piotrowski is a member of the Hearing Restoration Project, which helped fund this study.

Empower the Hearing Restoration Project's life-changing research. If you are able, please make a contribution today.

 
 
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Good to Hear: The Results Are In!

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By Gina Russo

Thank you for doing the most good for hearing loss through Hearing Health Foundation (HHF)’s Good to Hear giving campaign earlier this month.

You will recall our 24-hour giving period that began on March 3 aligned with the celebration of World Hearing Day―the World Health Organization (WHO)’s annual campaign to raise awareness of hearing loss care and prevention.

All generous donations made during the giving window were 100% matched by a group of  anonymous donors, and all credit card fees for online gifts were waived.

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HHF is delighted to report that more than 50 donors who care about hearing loss contributed to a remarkable total of $20,580 in donations!

This number was doubled as a result of the match to a grand total of $41,160 for hearing research and awareness! HHF is truly awed by our supporters’ generosity and commitment.

Funding is critical for our Hearing Restoration Project (HRP), Emerging Research Grants (ERG), Ménière's Disease Grants (MDG), and educational outreach programs, and to the scientists who are working hard to discover better treatments and cures for hearing loss and balance conditions. Giving went above and beyond our expectations for the campaign.

This critical work is only possible because of you, and we’re so grateful for your thoughtfulness and partnership. Only together can we improve quality of life for the millions living with hearing loss.

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A Home for Hearing Research

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By Neyeah Watson

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) commemorated 30 years as an institute of the National Institutes of Health in October 2018. Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) is proud to both honor and share in this milestone for the NIDCD, which focuses on biomedical advancements in hearing, balance, taste, smell, voice, speech, and language.

The need for the NIDCD was first championed by Geraldine Dietz Fox, a Philadelphia preschool teacher who, at 27, had developed a sensorineural hearing loss in her left ear from the mumps virus. In her search for resources and treatments, she discovered HHF, at the time known as Deafness Research Foundation, and joined its Board of Directors.

An advocate for hearing loss research, Fox was an influential member of HHF’s board but recognized the need to look beyond its nonprofit resources and toward government funding. Already politically connected by way of her father and husband, who worked on the campaigns of Florida Representative Claude Pepper and U.S. President Ronald Reagan, respectively, Fox headed to Washington, D.C., on behalf of HHF.

She befriended Robert Ruben, M.D., a chairperson for the National Committee for Research in Neurological and Communicative Disorders, a coalition of health agencies and scientists that worked to increase funding for the National Institute for Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke, as it was then known. A four-time Emerging Research Grants (ERG) recipient and otolaryngologist, Ruben had been urging Congress for support of more communication sciences research.

Fox’s new friendship with Ruben and other scientists, combined with her impressive zeal and demeanor as a private citizen with hearing loss, helped her gain an appointment to the advisory committee of the National Institute for Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke in 1986. But Fox was disappointed in the amount of hearing research supported by the institute, and she collaborated with Ruben and Peter Reinecke, a congressional staffer, to move toward crafting a bill for the creation of the NIDCD.

Reinecke worked closely with Pepper, who had a hearing loss of his own, and who teamed up with Iowa Senator Tom Harkin, whose brother had hearing loss. The legislation received bipartisan support and was signed into law by President Reagan in 1988, forming the NIDCD.

HHF’s lasting relationship with the NIDCD has been vital to new discoveries in hearing science. For example, HHF’s ERG program provides seed funding to talented researchers, most of whom go on to expand their research after successfully competing for larger NIDCD research grants. “HHF plays a seminal role in launching the independent research careers of many  scientists in hearing research,” said former NIDCD director James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

With gratitude to Fox, Ruben, and Reinecke for giving a home to hearing research, HHF is proud to have been associated with the NIDCD’s creation and celebrates the shared commitment to find better cures and treatments for hearing loss and related conditions.

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Sharper Than They Expected: A Tribute to Nansie Sharpless, Ph.D.

By Neyeah Watson

Women and people with disabilities have been historically underrepresented in science. In 2014, individuals with hearing loss compromised only 1.2% of Scientific & Engineering degree recipients. Women represented only 29% of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce as of the same year.

While these statistics remain low, women and people with disabilities have seen overwhelming growth in opportunity in the past 50 years, which we can attribute changes in policy, personal attitudes, and the success of some exceptional individuals. One such pioneering individual was Nansie Sharpless, Ph.D., a biochemist who lived with bilateral hearing loss. HHF has chosen to highlight her victories this Women’s History Month. Her motivation to push barriers strengthened the confidence society has in women in science today.

Sharpless was born in Pennsylvania in 1932. Though this year saw breakthroughs for women, such as the election of the first female Senator, Hattie Wyatt Caraway, and Amelia Earhart becoming the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, limitations remained. Women’s suffrage had just become a law 12 years prior, and the Equal Rights Amendment, which mandated gender equality and prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, did not yet exist. During childhood, Sharpless gravitated toward science, mathematics, and education. Tragically, at 14 Sharpless contracted meningitis, a disease that was still considered fatal at this time. Sharpless recovered but was left with a profound hearing loss in both ears.

Credit: American Association for the Advancement of Science

Credit: American Association for the Advancement of Science

Sharpless’ hearing loss did not halt her academic goals despite the lack of accommodations for students with disabilities at this time. The Education of All Handicapped Children's Act—which mandated schools to provide students with learning, mental and/or physical disabilities equal access to education and to protect them from harassment and discrimination—was not passed until 1975.

Still, Sharpless defeated the odds. In 1960, only 35% of the total bachelor’s degrees achieved were women. In comparison to today, over 57.34% of total bachelor’s degrees are women. In 1954 Sharpless earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology from Oberlin College. Although Sharpless thrived in school academically, she struggled to listen in the classroom. She was fortunate to have classmates who assisted with her notetaking.

Sharpless faced similar communicative challenges in her pursuit of a master’s degree in medical technology at Wayne State University. She attended meetings, learned innovative techniques, and developed strategies to alleviate her learning obstacles.

At Wayne, Sharpless’ strong educational performance was unprecedented—and unsupported. Administrators were discouraging; in fact, the director of admissions for Wayne State University warned Sharpless she’d face unusual scrutiny in which she would be expected to achieve a perfect grade point average in order to prove that she could handle the work. Sharpless was undeterred and went on to receive her doctorate from Wayne as well.

After graduation, Sharpless was hired to conduct biochemistry research at Mayo Clinic, where she focused on the correlations between chemicals and mental disorders. Some of her most notable work includes the studying of the L-dopa metabolism in spinal fluid and its relationship with Parkinson’s Disease. Her research showcased the patterns of dystonia, a movement disorder, in response to L-dopa therapy for Parkinson's disease.

Sharpless was also fortunate to defy expectations by joining the Albert Einstein Medical College faculty as an associate professor. She was later promoted to the position of Chief of the Albert Einstein Medical College’s Neuropsychopharmacological laboratory.

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Sharpless passed at the age of 55 while still serving in the Chief position at the Albert Einstein Medical College. In her career, Sharpless published over 50 papers and penned 11 books. Through her triumphs, Sharpless illustrated that hearing loss did not limit her. She was able to utilize her passion for science to become a dominant voice within research and advancement for women and for individuals with disabilities.

March celebrates the journeys of resilient women around the world. Gender and disabilities have presented challenges to individuals, especially before protective laws were in place. Sharpless fought to be outside of the statistic, seeking her purpose within what she loved most—science.

HHF intern Neyeah Watson studies communications at Brooklyn College.

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Hearing Restoration Project Scientific Director to Lead University’s Research Enterprise

By Tamara Hargens-Bradley, OHSU News

OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff

OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff

Peter Barr-Gillespie, Ph.D., will be Oregon Health & Science University’s (OHSU) first chief research officer and executive vice president, effective Jan. 1, 2019. Barr-Gillespie has served as interim senior vice president for research at OHSU since 2017.

In his new role, Barr-Gillespie will be principal adviser to OHSU President Danny Jacobs, M.D., FACS, on research strategy and research resource allocation. He will lead and manage OHSU’s research enterprise—comprising dozens of internationally and nationally acclaimed basic, translational, clinical, and public health research programs—and serve on the president’s executive leadership team.

“Dr. Barr-Gillespie has done a tremendous job leading the OHSU research mission on an interim basis. I’m delighted to appoint him to a new, permanent position that reflects his contributions and capabilities as well as the vital role of research at OHSU,” Jacobs says.

Barr-Gillespie also will collaborate with external academic, industrial and community research partners, and the various funding, regulatory and accrediting bodies. Moreover, he will represent OHSU in research collaborations with other universities in Oregon and the northwest region.

“I am excited to support Dr. Jacobs in developing OHSU’s 2025 strategic plan for research,” Barr-Gillespie says. “To be among the top-ranked research universities for NIH funding in the country and maintain our national reputation for cutting-edge research, we need to empower our researchers to do their best science by smartly investing in people, core resources, and space, and enhancing our graduate programs.”

OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff

OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff

Barr-Gillespie is an internationally recognized scholar, biomedical researcher and visionary academic leader who has been on faculty at OHSU since 1999. He currently holds faculty appointments in the departments of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Cell and Developmental Biology in OHSU’s School of Medicine and Oregon Hearing Research Center. He also is a senior scientist in the OHSU Vollum Institute.

An NIH-funded investigator, Barr-Gillespie’s research focus, his passion, is understanding the molecular mechanisms that enable our sense of hearing. Specifically, the Barr-Gillespie lab endeavors to determine how sensory cells in the inner ear called hair cells allow humans to perceive sound. Barr-Gillespie will maintain his active research program while serving as chief research officer.

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Barr-Gillespie is also the scientific director of the Hearing Restoration Project (HRP), an international consortium of 14 investigators funded by Hearing Health Foundation. The HRP’s goal is to develop a biological therapy for hearing loss arising from destruction of hair cells, which are not regenerated after damage from noise, ototoxic drugs, or aging.

Barr-Gillespie earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Reed College in 1981, carrying out his senior undergraduate thesis at OHSU after a summer fellowship in OHSU’s biochemistry department. He received his doctorate in pharmacology at the University of Washington in 1988, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in physiology, cell biology and neuroscience with Jim Hudspeth, M.D., Ph.D., at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1993.

Following his fellowship, he accepted a faculty position in physiology at Johns Hopkins and remained there until accepting the position of scientist at the OHSU Vollum Institute and associate professor of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery in the OHSU School of Medicine in 1999. In 2014, Barr-Gillespie was appointed associate vice president for basic research at OHSU.

As a young investigator, Barr-Gillespie was named a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences, a program that funds research “that shows outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health.” During his tenure at OHSU, he has been honored with the Faculty Excellence in Education Award and the John A. Resko Faculty Research Achievement and Mentoring Award.

Over his distinguished career, he has published more than 115 scholarly articles, chapters, and reviews, and has been an invited lecturer at dozens of research universities, academic conferences, and scientific events.

Barr-Gillespie and his wife, Ann Barr-Gillespie, D.P.T., Ph.D., live in Portland. She is the vice provost and executive dean of the College of Health Professions at the Pacific University Hillsboro campus. Their children are Aidan Gillespie, 17, and Katie Gillespie, 24, whom Peter and Ann share with their mother, Susan Gillespie. In their spare time, Peter and Ann enjoy cycling and hiking.

This is republished with permission from OHSU News.

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