faces of hearing loss

The Bridge Between Two Worlds

By Vicky Chan

Disability rights attorney Jared Allebest was born with a bilateral profound hearing loss. He was diagnosed at age 1 and fitted for hearing aids a year later. Today, Jared uses both hearing aids and ASL to communicate.

The son of a lawyer, Jared was determined to follow in his father’s footsteps and his hearing loss never deterred him. Throughout his education, he remained inspired by his favorite elementary school teacher, Ms. Marquardt, who taught him one of the most invaluable lessons: Having a hearing loss isn’t a barrier to success. “[Hearing loss] has affected my outlook to fight harder and to push myself to accomplish the things that I want to do in my life,” Jared explains.

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After his graduation from Thomas Jefferson School of Law in 2009, Jared founded a law firm that advocates for people with hearing loss and speaking disabilities. The firm focuses on empowering their clients through education, advocacy, and lobbying. He works with clients with both typical hearing and hearing loss and takes on cases relating to disability rights or discrimination, as well as employment, marriage/divorce, and criminal law.

Jared admits that he faces auditory challenges in his profession. During trials, he has to be exceptionally attentive to all parties. He also receives assistance from an ASL interpreter in the courtroom so he doesn’t miss anything being said.

Despite some difficulty, Jared believes that his hearing loss is an advantage. His clients are more comfortable with him because they know he can empathize with them. People listen carefully when he speaks about issues concerning hearing loss. “By fighting for the rights of those who live with hearing loss, I am advocating for myself as well. I think of myself as the bridge between two worlds,” Jared says.

Jared’s strong reputation as a dedicated lawyer stems from his sincerity and passion for helping others with legal issues that are deeply personal to him. The most rewarding part of his profession is knowing that his clients are satisfied with his commitment.

Jared’s advocacy for the hearing loss community outside goes beyond the courtroom. He is the former chairman of Loop Utah—an advocacy group dedicated to educating people in Utah about the benefits of loop technology. He currently serves as a community representative on the Advisory Council to the Utah Division of Services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (USDB Advisory Council).

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Of course, Jared knows he can’t be an advocate for all people with hearing loss, as much as he would like to be. He can’t be the connection between the legal world and the hearing loss world for everyone. Jared maintains that the most important part of living with hearing loss is effective self-advocacy. “Being assertive about your needs will help you to hear better, be more productive, and be happier.”

Jared lives and practices law in Utah. He is a participant in HHF’s Faces of Hearing Loss campaign.

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Hearing Loss Lives with Me

By Sonya Daniel

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I was born with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. I didn’t know the official term for it until 2008. When I was a kid in elementary school I passed every hearing test that the mothers in the PTA administered. I was a pretty clever little girl. I learned that every test has a visible “tell” and knew how to guess “right” on all of them. I never wanted to fail any test. I learned to read lips, and assumed everyone heard that annoying ringing constantly. That, of course isn’t true.

The tinnitus became too overwhelming to deal with everyday. I hadn’t had my ears tested since I was little, so I didn’t know what to expect. It was much worse than I had ever imagined it would be. And now it had a name. I left the audiologist knowing at some point I’d be completely deaf. But, no one knows when that might be. I was a mother to three young boys. I wondered how much longer I’d hear, “Mommy, I love you.” Or If they’d hold out long enough to hear their grown-up man voices. How much longer until I couldn’t hear music?

Music is my passion. In fact, it’s my chosen profession. I never remember wanting to do anything but be a musician in some capacity. My dad played the guitar. My mother said when I was little I would sit in front of him and touch his guitar and I would stand in front of the stereo and touch the speakers. I suppose I was trying to “hear” the music. I knew I’d go to college and major in music as a vocalist. I knew I wanted to share my love for music and teach others.

College was a very difficult and stressful time. There was a course called “Sight Singing and Ear Training” required to complete my Bachelor’s in Music. I mean, come on! Ear training? I struggled. Professors struggled to teach me. Some never gave up because it was apparent I wasn’t going anywhere.

I did get to teach music to every level. I can’t do that anymore, but I still do music everyday. Sometimes in life you have to know that there are things that your body just won’t let you do. I’d like to be a 6’0” tall, blonde supermodel, too. My body said “no” to that and I think I’m ok.      
Living with tinnitus and hearing loss can be overwhelming and difficult. I’m not as afraid of living this way as I used to be. Everyone has a thing. This is just mine. I like to say I don’t live with hearing loss; it lives with me.

My journey has brought me to the cochlear implant. I’m a candidate in the preliminary stages of that process. Technology changes so fast it’s hard to keep up. My current devices have stronger receiver tubes and ear molds.

That’s just my journey with my ears. My life isn’t defined by or consumed with my ears, although it’s felt that way at times. I’m constantly learning and growing. I’m getting stronger with each high and low I face. But, isn’t that just life?

Sonya Daniel is a musician/teacher, writer, and voiceover artist. She is a participant in HHF’s “Faces of Hearing Loss” campaign.

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HHF Launches Faces of Hearing Loss Campaign

Think of someone you know who has hearing loss. Who do you see?

You envision a relative, but you are not thinking of your 4-year-old niece. A neighbor comes to mind, but not the 32-year-old who lives across the street.

This is a trick question. Hearing loss—and related conditions like tinnitus, Ménière's disease, and hyperacusis—can affect anyone, anywhere. Hearing loss is your 4-year-old niece, your 32-year-old neighbor, your colleague in her mid-20s. Hearing loss affects every age, race, ethnicity, and gender.

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No one is immune from developing a hearing and balance disorder—and hearing loss has no single face. To refute common misconceptions that it only affects older adults, HHF has collected images of individuals living with a hearing condition to capture the diversity of its impact across the country. These are HHF’s “Faces of Hearing Loss.”

Participants shared their picture, current age, state of residence, type of hearing condition, and the age at onset or diagnosis. Among the tens of millions of Americans with hearing loss are an 11-year-old boy in Oregon, an 80-year-old woman living in Washington, and a 47-year-old man in North Dakota. These individuals may never meet, but “Faces of Hearing Loss” connects them through their shared experiences.

If you or a loved one has hearing loss, please consider participating in “Faces of Hearing Loss” by completing this brief form, sending in picture, and answering a few basic questions. If you are the parent of a child under 18, you may sign a release form on their behalf.

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