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Kennth Vaden, Ph.D. is researching Speech Recognition; Neural Representations; Adaptive Control; and Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD). Dr. Vaden long term expected outcome from this line of research is to develop neural endophenotypes and methods to enhance characterization of CAPD. A control system that modulates auditory cortex activity could also provide a brain mechanism to guide future interventions. Dr. Vaden studies brain systems that support speech communication and how these change with age. His research is funded by the General Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons International. Meet the 2015 Emerging Researchers.
 
Hearing Health Foundation's Hearing Restoration Project (HRP) scientist, Stefan Heller, was published in Cell Reports on June 9, 2015. Heller's lab identified patterns of gene expression that my determine whether the ear's inner pillar cells can give rise to new hair cells, which are key to hearing. This discovery could lead to new ways of evaluating, in animal models, experimental drug treatments intended to prevent hearing loss or restore hearing. Learn more about the HRP, Heller's research and the path to a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus.
 
 
Help us change the course of hearing research and find a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus! Hearing Health Foundation’s “Name a Research Grant” program enables donors to name and fund a specific research grant in their name or in honor or memory of a loved one.
 
We're currently planning for our 2016 grant cycle. If you're interested in naming a research grant in any discipline within the hearing and balance space, such as Usher Syndrome, hyperacusis, stria, or tinnitus, please contact development@hhf.org
 
Have your heard about the guy who is hiking 500 miles of the
Colorado Trail, and summiting multiple mountains, for hearing health? Meet John Hoffman, a committed supporter who has had hearing loss since birth. He is hiking so the Hearing Health Foundation can continue researching toward a cure for hearing loss and to improve the quality of life for him and others with hearing loss, including his niece, who currently wears cochlear implants. 
 
 
 
Researchers have found that patients stricken with dangerous bacterial infections are at greater risk of hearing loss than previously recognized. Inflammation from the bacterial infections substantially increased susceptibility to hearing impairment by increasing the uptake of aminoglycoside antibiotics into the inner ear.
 
 
Recently, HHF has received several questions regarding a much-publicized report on gene therapies for hearing loss. Peter G. Barr-Gillespie, Ph.D., scientific research director of HHF's Hearing Restoration Project, untangles what the research means and how it can be seen in the larger context of finding a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus.
 
 
 
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