Hearing Research

Hearing Loss Film “Hearing Hope” Captures Personal Strength, Scientific Vision

Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) has created a new short film, “Hearing Hope,” to expand awareness of hearing health through the voices of those who benefit from and those who carry out the foundation’s life-changing work.

 "It took me longer to talk than most kids. Because I couldn't understand what they were saying so I couldn't copy it," explains Emmy, 7.

"It took me longer to talk than most kids. Because I couldn't understand what they were saying so I couldn't copy it," explains Emmy, 7.

The third most prevalent chronic physical condition in the U.S., hearing loss can affect anyone—from first-grader Emmy to retired U.S. Army Colonel John—but its reach is often underestimated. “It’s one of the most common sensory deficits in humans,” explains cochlear implant surgeon Dr. Anil Lalwani. “I think we have to go from it being hidden to being visible.”

Both a hearing aid user and cochlear implant recipient, seventh-grader Alex is doing his part to make hearing loss less hidden. Smiling, he says he wants people to know that hearing with his devices makes him happy. John wishes to be an advocate for veterans and all who live with hearing loss and tinnitus.

 When she received her hearing loss diagnosis at 17, NASA engineer Renee never thought she'd be living her dream.

When she received her hearing loss diagnosis at 17, NASA engineer Renee never thought she'd be living her dream.

The film also highlights resilience in response to the challenges associated with hearing conditions. Video participant Renee saw her dream of becoming an astronaut halted at 17 when her hearing loss was detected. Now she helps send people to space as an engineer at NASA.

Sophia describes the “low, low rock bottom” she hit when she was diagnosed with Usher Syndrome, the leading cause of deafblindness. Yet she feels special knowing her disability shapes her and sets her apart.

Jason recounts having no resources for hearing loss in children when his son, Ethan, failed his newborn hearing screening. Today he’s grateful for Ethan’s aptitude for language, made possible through his early hearing loss intervention.

With the support of HHF, more progress is made each year. “I’m glad that the doctors are trying to figure out how fish and birds can restore their hearing,” says Emmy.

For the past 60 years, HHF has funded promising hearing science and in 2011 established the Hearing Restoration Project (HRP), an international consortium dedicated to finding biological cures for hearing loss using fish, bird, and mouse models to replicate the phenomenon of hearing loss reversal in humans.

“If [the HRP] can achieve that goal of hearing restoration...that would be a marvelous thing for hearing loss,” reiterates Dr. Robert Dobie.

Through “Hearing Hope,” HHF would like to share its mission and message of hope to as many individuals as possible and reassure those with hearing loss and their loved ones they are not alone. As an organization that channels all efforts into research and education, HHF would greatly appreciate any assistance or suggestions to increase visibility of the film.

Watch the full film at www.hhf.org/video. Closed captioning is available.

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Understanding a Pressure Relief Valve in the Inner Ear

By Ian Swinburne, Ph.D.

The inner ear senses sound to order to hear as well as sensing head movements in order to balance. Sounds or body movements create waves in the fluid within the ear. Specialized cells called hair cells, because of their thin hairlike projections, are submerged within this fluid. Hair cells bend in response to these waves, with channels that open in response to the bending. The makeup of the ear’s internal fluid is critical because as it flows through these channels its contents encode the information that becomes a biochemical and then a neural signal. The endolymphatic sac of the inner ear is thought to have important roles in stabilizing this fluid that is necessary for sensing sound and balance.

  This study helps unravel how a valve in the inner ear's endolymphatic sac acts to relieve fluid pressure, one key to understanding disorders affected by pressure abnormalities such as Ménière’s disease.

This study helps unravel how a valve in the inner ear's endolymphatic sac acts to relieve fluid pressure, one key to understanding disorders affected by pressure abnormalities such as Ménière’s disease.

While imaging transparent zebrafish, my team and I found a pressure-sensitive relief valve in the endolymphatic sac that periodically opens to release excess fluid, thus preventing the tearing of tissue. In our paper published in the journal eLife June 19, 2018, we describe how the relief valve is composed of physical barriers that open in response to pressure. The barriers consist of cells adhering to one another and thin overlapping cell projections that are continuously remodeling and periodically separating in response to pressure.

The unexpected discovery of a physical relief valve in the ear emphasizes the need for further study into how organs control fluid pressure, volume, flow, and ion homeostasis (balance of ions) in development and disease. It suggests a new mechanism underlying several hearing and balance disorders characterized by pressure abnormalities, including Ménière’s disease.

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Here is a time-lapse video of the endolymphatic sac, with the sac labeled “pressure relief valve” at 0:40.

2017 Ménière’s Disease Grants scientist Ian A. Swinburne, Ph.D., is conducting research at Harvard Medical School. He was also a 2013 Emerging Research Grants recipient.

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Uncovering a Signaling Molecule That Modulates Avian Hair Cell Regeneration

By Rebecca M. Lewis, Au.D., Ph.D., and Jennifer Stone, Ph.D.

Mammals including humans cannot regenerate hair cells, but other species such as birds and fish readily regenerate hair cells after damage to restore auditory function. The gene ATOH1 produces a protein that pushes supporting cells—cells that neighbor hair cells—to either directly convert into a hair cell or to divide and form a new hair cell. However, ATOH1 expression (when the gene is turned on) does not guarantee that hair cells develop in birds or mammals, which suggests that there are factors that prevent supporting cells from changing into hair cells. Identifying these factors in birds may help us better understand the lack of hair cell regeneration in mammals.

  This schematic depicts our current ideas for how BMP4 regulates ATOH1 expression and therefore hair cell regeneration in the avian hearing organ. It shows (from left) typical hair cells, hair cell damage, and hair cell regeneration. Typical hair cells secrete BMP4. When hair cells die, BMP4 signaling is reduced, which allows ATOH1 to be expressed in supporting cells and pushes supporting cells to turn into hair cells. The newly regenerated hair cells secrete BMP4, suppressing ATOH1 in supporting cells and restoring the normal condition.

This schematic depicts our current ideas for how BMP4 regulates ATOH1 expression and therefore hair cell regeneration in the avian hearing organ. It shows (from left) typical hair cells, hair cell damage, and hair cell regeneration. Typical hair cells secrete BMP4. When hair cells die, BMP4 signaling is reduced, which allows ATOH1 to be expressed in supporting cells and pushes supporting cells to turn into hair cells. The newly regenerated hair cells secrete BMP4, suppressing ATOH1 in supporting cells and restoring the normal condition.

We examined the avian auditory system to characterize a potential inhibitor to ATOH1 during hair cell regeneration: bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4). Bone morphogenetic proteins are secreted signaling molecules that regulate cellular processes in many regions of the body, including the nervous system. We found that BMP4 localizes to hair cells of the mature avian hearing organ and disappears when hair cells die or sustain damage. From this, we hypothesized that BMP4 may prevent ATOH1 expression in supporting cells and loss of BMP4 when hair cells die may enable ATOH1 to be expressed in supporting cells, driving them to convert into hair cells.

When we exposed avian auditory organs to BMP4 after selectively killing hair cells, this prevented ATOH1 expression and hair cell regeneration. When we antagonized BMP4 using an inhibitor, we found a generally opposite result: an increase in the number of regenerated hair cells.

We conclude that BMP4 is a potent inhibitor of ATOH1 and therefore suppresses hair cell regeneration. We recommend that BMP4 be explored further in studies of mammalian hair cell regeneration.

Published in Hearing Research on May 2, 2018, this study detailing BMP4’s negative effect on ATOH1 expands our knowledge of signaling molecules that suppress hair cell regeneration in birds and may also modulate hair cell regeneration in humans.

Rebecca M. Lewis, Au.D., Ph.D., is a clinical audiologist and auditory neuroscientist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School in Boston. HRP researcher Jennifer Stone, Ph.D., is the director of research in the department of otolaryngology–head and neck surgery at the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center at the University of Washington.

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Researchers Fighting the Effects of Noise

By Yishane Lee

The cornerstone of Hearing Health Foundation, ever since its founding in 1958 as the Deafness Research Foundation, has been funding early-career researchers who bring innovative thinking to hearing and balance research. HHF’s Emerging Research Grants (ERG) are awarded to the most promising scientists in the field, with many going on to earn prestigious National Institutes of Health backing.

HHF is always proud to see ERG grantees thrive in their careers and research. Most recently, two ERG scientists funded in the mid-1990s have made headlines, each for treatments for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).

1996 and 1997 ERG scientist John Oghalai, M.D., of the University of Southern California, coauthored a study showing promise for preventing NIHL. Published May 7, 2018, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Oghalai and team used miniature optics to examine the mouse cochlea after exposure to extremely loud noise, and found that in addition to immediate hair cell death, a fluid buildup in the inner ear over several hours eventually led to nerve cell loss. The fluid buildup, or endolymph hydrops, contributes to synaptopathy, or damage to the auditory nerve cell synapse. In a USC News press release, Oghalai described the excess fluid as a feeling of fullness and ringing in the ear that a person may experience after attending a loud concert.

Because the extra fluid showed a high concentration of potassium, the team saw a method to re-balance the fluids that naturally occur in the inner ear by injecting a salt (sodium) and sugar solution into the middle ear three hours after exposure. Nerve cell loss was reduced by 45 to 64 percent, which may help preserve hearing. The researchers see applications for this treatment for military service members who experience blast trauma as well as for people who have Ménière’s disease, the hearing and balance condition that is associated with inner ear fluid buildup.

  Images from the cochleae of guinea pigs show the presence of more hair cells in animals treated with a short interfering RNA that interrupts a gene upregulated after damage (right; control on left). Inner and outer hair cells (IHC and OHC) are labeled in green, stereocilia in yellow, and nuclei in blue. Arrowheads indicate ectopic hair cells. Credit:  The Scientist  via  Molecular Therapy .

Images from the cochleae of guinea pigs show the presence of more hair cells in animals treated with a short interfering RNA that interrupts a gene upregulated after damage (right; control on left). Inner and outer hair cells (IHC and OHC) are labeled in green, stereocilia in yellow, and nuclei in blue. Arrowheads indicate ectopic hair cells. Credit: The Scientist via Molecular Therapy.

1996 ERG scientist Richard Kopke, M.D., FACS, of the Hough Ear Institute in Oklahoma, spent more than 20 years serving with the U.S. Army, becoming well aware of the dangers of NIHL for service members. In a paper in Molecular Therapy, published online in March 2018, Kopke and colleagues used “small interfering RNAs” (siRNAs) to block the activity of the Notch signaling pathway gene Hes1 that itself blocks hair cell differentiation in developing supporting cells and may contribute to the failure of hair cells to regenerate after injury.

These siRNAs were delivered using nanoparticles directly injected to the cochleae of live, adult guinea pigs. Kopke’s team had previously shown using siRNAs to block Hes1 to be effective in regenerating hair cells in cultured mouse cochlea. In the current study, the 24-hour, sustained-release of siRNAs through nanoparticles three days after deafening resulted in the recovery of some hearing ability, measured using auditory brainstem responses, at three weeks and continuing to nine weeks, when the study ended. Compared with the control mice, the RNA-injected mice showed less overall hair cell loss and early signs of immature hair cell development, which the authors say may signal hair cell regeneration. Hearing loss caused by noise, chemotherapy drugs, or aging that damages or kills hair cells are all targets for this potential treatment.

In an article in The Scientist, HHF’s Hearing Restoration Project consortium member Jennifer Stone, Ph.D., who was not involved in the paper, echoed the study authors in saying further research should work to determine which cells are turning into hair cells, and whether the observed hair cell development is truly new hair cells and not the repair of damaged hair cells. Kopke and team plan to test the treatment using longer periods between deafening and injection, while also modifying dose and delivery.

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Stenting to Relieve One Specific Cause of Pulsatile Tinnitus

By Jayne Wallace for the Weill Cornell Medicine Brain and Spine Center

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 15 percent of the U.S. population, or 48 million people, have some type of tinnitus, hearing a ringing or buzzing in the absence of an external sound source.

Pulsatile tinnitus, in contrast, usually has a sound source. In these cases, affecting fewer than 10 percent of tinnitus patients, sounds are caused by turbulence in the blood flow around the ear. And among these cases, intracranial hypertension comprises about 8 percent of cases. This is when narrowing in one of the large veins in the brain causes a disturbance in the blood flow, leading to the pulsatile tinnitus.

  Dural arteriovenous fistula, MRA showed only subtle alterations as a result of atypical flows in the right transverse sinus (arrow). Photo courtesy of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

Dural arteriovenous fistula, MRA showed only subtle alterations as a result of atypical flows in the right transverse sinus (arrow). Photo courtesy of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

“Traditionally there has been no good treatment for many of these patients who are told to learn to live with it,” says Athos Patsalides, M.D., an interventional neuroradiologist at New York City’s Weill Cornell Medicine Brain and Spine Center, where he also serves as an associate professor of radiology in neurological surgery.

Till now, available treatments—medication or more complicated surgery—were either ineffective or produced side effects and other problems just as bad or worse. “That’s why we started the clinical trials for venous sinus stenting, a minimally invasive procedure that is very effective in alleviating the narrowing in the vein,” says Patsalides, who pioneered the use of VSS to treat patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri because the symptoms tend to mirror those of a brain tumor.

“Many IIH patients suffer from vision loss, headaches, and pulsatile tinnitus, and I saw a pattern with patients experiencing resolution of the pulsatile tinnitus immediately after VSS,” Patsalides says.

This led to the possibility of using VSS for selected patients with pulsatile tinnitus. After the Food and Drug Administration approved the clinical trial, it began in May 2016 and has an estimated completion date of January 2021.

“In the stenting procedure, with the patient under general anesthesia, we insert a tiny, soft catheter into a vein located in the upper part of the leg and thread it up to the affected vein in the brain,” Patsalides says.

A self-expanding stent is deployed into the narrowed segment of the vein, relieving the stenosis, restoring normal blood flow, and reducing or eliminating the pulsatile tinnitus. “Happily, the patient is typically discharged from the hospital within 24 to 48 hours,” he says.

To learn more, see weillcornellbrainandspine.org. Hearing Health Foundation notes that the trial is ongoing, and that the procedure is potentially able to address only one specific cause of pulsatile tinnitus and should not be taken as a solution for other forms of tinnitus, which often has no known cause.

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A Clinical Trial for a New Drug to Protect Hearing

By Yishane Lee

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a novel drug to protect against ototoxicity (harmfulness to hearing) due to the use of aminoglycoside antibiotics to treat severe infections. The FDA approval paves the way for a Phase I clinical trial to test whether the drug, found to be significantly protective in animals, is safe for humans.

  Mature lateral line hair cells from larval zebrafish (shown with the neuromast sensory organ enlarged) serve as a platform for studying drugs and genes that modulate hair cell susceptibility to ototoxic agents.  

Mature lateral line hair cells from larval zebrafish (shown with the neuromast sensory organ enlarged) serve as a platform for studying drugs and genes that modulate hair cell susceptibility to ototoxic agents.  

The drug, ORC-13661, was developed by University of Washington professors Edwin Rubel, Ph.D., and David Raible, Ph.D., who are members of Hearing Health Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board and Hearing Restoration Project, respectively, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientist Julian Simons, Ph.D. “While this program was not directly funded by HHF, both David and I have definitely been supported by HHF for a long time,” Rubel says. “This is a drug to prevent hearing loss that we've developed over the past 15-plus years.”

Rubel points out the drug’s two main features: “It is a brand new drug with a composition of matter patent, not one that is used for other medical purposes and being repurposed; and it is the first drug that was developed, from the get-go, to protect hair cells from ototoxic injury.”

After screening libraries of potential chemicals to see which stopped hair cell death in zebrafish lateral line system, Rubel, Raible, and team identified the best candidate and then boosted its effectiveness by tweaking its chemical structure; results were published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in January 2018.

Rubel adds, “Toxicity studies in zebrafish, rats, and dogs required by the FDA show superior safety and nearly 100 percent hearing protection at all frequencies.” If the Phase I trial shows the drug is safe for humans, the next step is to test its efficacy among patients using aminoglycosides.

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Hearing—With Difficulty Understanding: Life With Auditory Processing Disorder

By Lauren McGrath

This April, Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) draws your attention to Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), a condition that causes impairments in sound localization—the ability to identify sound sources—and has been closely linked to autism. April 4 is recognized as APD Awareness Day in some regions of the U.S. and April is Autism Awareness Month nationwide.

APD occurs when the central nervous system has difficulty processing verbal or auditory information, specifically in noisy, social environments. Individuals with APD do not necessarily have a diagnosed hearing loss; in fact, many have normal audiogram results. With APD and typical hearing, the inner ear properly sends signals to the brain, but, once received, the brain fails to interpret and analyze these sounds accurately, resulting in jumbled messages.

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In the U.S., it is estimated five percent of school-age children, or 2.5 million children, have APD. Individuals with APD are often unable to hear sounds as words and have learning problems, including difficulty in reading, spelling, and language comprehension. It is vital to review the symptoms, demographics, and treatments of APD, should you suspect it in yourself or a loved one.

Individuals with APD have trouble distinguishing between words or syllables that sound alike (auditory discrimination) and recalling what they heard (poor auditory memory). They show delayed responses to verbal requests and instructions and will often ask someone to repeat what has been said. APD is commonly misdiagnosed as ADD/ADHD, dyslexia, or hearing loss.

Demographically, APD is a common secondary diagnosis for children with autism; most children diagnosed with autism have auditory processing disorders or auditory difficulties. HHF Emerging Research Grants (ERG) recipient Elizabeth McCullagh, Ph.D.’s 2017 published work in The Journal of Comparative Neurology examines the strong connection between Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common genetic form of autism, and difficulties with sound localization.

Additionally, APD is prevalent in individuals with neurological problems, including those who have experienced head injuries or strokes. Older adults, who are more susceptible to some cognitive decline, are also at greater risk for APD.

Military veterans who have been repeatedly exposed to blasts are another community disproportionately affected by APD. An estimated 15% of all returning military personnel live with APD. HHF’s ERG recipient Edward Bartlett, Ph.D., explains that the changes to the central auditory system may account for the behavioral issues that veterans experience, such as problems with memory, learning, communication, and emotional regulation.

Retired U.S. Army Colonel John Dillard of HHF’s Board of Directors remarks, “It is truly unfortunate that our veterans, after making such honorable sacrifices, are forced to live with APD, often alongside tinnitus and/or hearing loss. I am hopeful that future scientific advancements will better the lives of veterans and all Americans.”

There are no cures for APD, but there are many treatments that aim to improve the effectiveness of everyday communication. These include environmental modifications, addressing functional deficits, and improving listening and spoken language comprehension. Pursuing treatment for APD as early as possible is imperative, McCullagh explains, because hearing is vital to social and educational interactions. “Those with APD often develop issues with language development, hearing in noise, and sound localization. Risks associated include not being able to participate in noisy environments which can often result in depression and anxiety.”

Much more research of APD is needed to improve the accuracy of methodologies for diagnosis and to determine the best interventions for each child or adult. Even though there are available strategies to treat APD, researchers, including those funded by HHF, largely through the generosity of the Royal Arch Masons Research Assistance, are hard at work finding alternative treatments that will improve the lives of those with APD.

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Moving Toward a Future Free of Drug-Induced Hearing Loss

By Erik Robinson

A new special publication orchestrated by five of the nation’s leading hearing experts compiles the latest research into hearing loss caused by drugs and solvents—how it occurs, how to treat it, and how to prevent it.

  HHF Council of Scientific Trustees member Peter Steyger, Ph.D., and colleagues produced a special  Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience  publication on the topic of ototoxicity.

HHF Council of Scientific Trustees member Peter Steyger, Ph.D., and colleagues produced a special Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience publication on the topic of ototoxicity.

The compilation was published online as a special research topic by the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience on March 5, 2018. It includes both original research and focused reviews. The Pharmaceutical Interventions for Hearing Loss Working Group organized the effort at the behest of the Department of Defense (DoD) Hearing Center of Excellence.

“We’re trying to elevate ways for the human population to avoid losing this important sensation for experiencing and communicating with the world around us,” says coauthor Peter Steyger, Ph.D., a professor of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery in the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Medicine, and a member of Hearing Health Foundation’s Council of Scientific Trustees.

“Ototoxicity is a threat to hearing at any age and hearing loss remains a significant side effect of chemotherapy. This review highlights how far we’ve come in understanding that threat and provides us with a roadmap for developing more effective ways to recognize and address the problem,” adds coauthor Jian Zuo, Ph.D., of the department of developmental neurobiology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

In people, hearing cells don’t regenerate so the loss is irreversible. That’s why it is crucial to understand the mechanisms that affect hearing and how to prevent loss of hearing, Steyger says. The introductory editorial, “Moving Toward a Future Free of Ototoxicity,” highlights the latest scientific research exploring how certain pharmaceuticals damage the inner ear while others can protect it. It also highlights the need for better monitoring and detection of hearing loss over time, especially among patients being treated with antibiotics.

Steyger, who lost hearing as a child after being treated with antibiotics for meningitis when 14 months old, noted that hearing loss affects a surprisingly large proportion of the population—rising from an estimated 1 in 500 newborns to as many as half of all people age 75 or older. The research encapsulated in the new e-book includes 23 scientific articles from 93 authors and represents the state of the science in both prevention and treatment of ototoxicity hearing loss. (The e-book is available to all, free of charge.)

“This compilation will help to propel our knowledge forward and underscore the need to better understand the dangers of ototoxicity. The DoD Hearing Center of Excellence is honored to host and mobilize this important effort,” says coauthor Carlos Esquivel, M.D., a neurotologist and chief medical officer in the Clinical Care, Rehabilitation, and Restoration Branch of the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence at Joint Base San Antonio in Texas.

In addition to Steyger, Zuo, and Esquivel, the publication’s editors include Lisa Cunningham, Ph.D., of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and Kelly Watts, Au.D., of the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence.

This originally appeared in OHSU News and was republished with permission. 

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Mapping Better Hearing

By Vicky Chan

Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) is grateful to the many individuals and organizations who have empowered groundbreaking hearing loss research in the last 60 years. A new interactive map displays every institution in the U.S. where HHF has been fortunate to fund groundbreaking research, yielding outstanding advancements in hearing and balance science. The map also indicates the rates of hearing loss in each state, signaling that additional work is urgently needed.

The colors—light yellow, yellow, green, teal, blue, and purple—represent the rates of hearing loss in each state. The calculations are based off 2015 U.S. Census Data, using estimates from the well-known prevalence of hearing loss among specific demographics. At the lowest end of the range in light yellow, hearing loss affects 13.71% of Colorado’s population. The highest rate was found in Missouri, purple, where the prevalence measured 20.15%. The mean for all states was 18.16%. The numbers signal the significance of hearing loss research.

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Nearly all of the institutions on the map represent recipients of the Emerging Research Grants (ERG) who have carried out investigations related to tinnitus, hyperacusis, Ménière's disease, Usher syndrome, hearing loss in children, Central Auditory Processing Disorder, and strial atrophy.

A few institutions are home to the work of the Hearing Restoration Project’s (HRP) domestic consortium members, who focus on investigating hair cell regeneration as a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus. They conduct research at Baylor College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Oregon Health & Science University, Stanford University, Stowers Institute, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Southern California, University of Washington, and Washington University.

By mid-year, the institutions corresponding to HHF’s newly formed Ménière's Disease Grants (MDG) program will be added to the map.

HHF envisions a world in which no one lives with hearing loss and tinnitus—until this is realized, we’ll do everything we can to put more innovative hearing loss research on the map.

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2018: Hear's to You

By Nadine Dehgan

From every one of us at Hearing Health Foundation (HHF)—scientists, staff, and volunteers—thank you for your support in 2017 and best wishes for 2018.

Because of folks like you, 2017 was an incredible year in which HHF:

  • Increased funding for Hearing Restoration Project & Emerging Research Grants by 35%
  • Launched Ménière's Disease Grants program to better understand & treat this condition
  • Began to fund critical Ototoxic Drug Research so cancer survivors won't have to live with hearing loss as a result of their life-saving treatments
  • Advocated for universal newborn hearing screenings, resulting in the passage of the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Act
  • Endorsed the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act, which will provide a more affordable and accessible treatment option for adults with mild to moderate hearing loss
  • Created Faces of Hearing Loss to show that hearing and balance disorders affect all of us
  • Received Top Ratings from all Charity Watchdogs including Consumer Reports and BBB

With hearts full of gratitude, we look forward to the work to be done in 2018—HHF’s 60th anniversary year.

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With your help, HHF will continue to fund groundbreaking discoveries for the tens of millions of Americans with hearing loss and tinnitus—among whom is Ethan, 6, born with bilateral (in both ears) hearing loss and fortunate to receive early intervention.

Ethan is a first-grader who loves his sisters, soccer, reading, math, and martial arts. Until a cure for hearing loss is realized, he will be dependent on hearing aids or other treatments.

New scientific findings in 2018—empowered by you—can change the future of hearing loss for Ethan and so many others. I look forward to updating you on progress made.

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